Sunday, September 22, 2019

Wild buffalo (Indian gaur ) sighted in the forest of Bolangir.;Sudhir Mishra Bolangir;


22nd September2019.
 Wild buffalo (Indian gaur ) sighted in the forest of Bolangir.
Bolangir; The recent sighting of  a single Indian gaur, locally called as jungli podh or wild buffalo , four days ago on the forest outskirt of Bolangir town has brought cheers among the wildlife lovers here.
Wild buffalo as called by local, is a shy and violent animal. When it gets food water and shelter, it stays there. It is a shy animal. It becomes wild when comes in contact with human being directly, points out a local wild life lover here.
In summer this years a wildlife enthusiast managed to take a single photograph of wild buffalo in the forest of Bolangir.By that time it appears to be a Juvenile wild buffalo. Few months later nearby village people also informed about the movement of wild buffalo to this correspondent ,besides others.
However it is pertinent to mention here that wild buffalo (Indian gaur ) moves in heard, or with a minimum of two. And given this situation, how a single wild buffalo is moving, that remains to watch and needs further monitoring, points another wildlife lover.
Three years ago in the forest of Upparjhar,in Bolangir forest range,  two wild buffalo were sighted. When local forest staff tried to get a glimpse of then they sped away into the forest of Upparjhar within minutes .
Effort to get a comment on this situation from DFO Balangir Sri Sameer Satpathy was not possible as his mobile replied “not reachable” when contracted by this correspondent.

Set up a cancer Hospital at Bolangir; No. of Cancer Patients in Bolangir is rising

Set up  a cancer Hospital at Bolangir.
Bolangir; The mention of Bolangir district, very often reflects a picture of district regularly affected by drought and economically backward district of State of Odisha, from where thousands of people migrates along with their family and children to brick kilns of Telegngana, Andhra Pradesh ,Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and other states in search of livelihood only to face torture and exploitation there.
However, even though Bolangir is economically backward district and its economy is predominantly based on agricultureand no industr , yet ,according to reports , the number of Cancer patients is rising in the district.
In 2017-18; 103 people were given chemotheraphy cycle and the number of people given chemotheraphy cycle  in 2018-19 increased to 265. And till September2019 a total of 173 people were given chemotheraphy cycle says District Cancer Nodal officer Dr Abinash Mishra. Besides this around 1000 people have checked in the Outpatient Department, Mishra says further. 
In a related development today, members of JanaMoracha,a social organization, led by Basu Rath and others submitted a memorandum to CM through district collector demanding setting up a cancer hospital at Bolangir.
 We submitted a memorandum for setting up a cancer hospital at Bolangir in view of increasing number of cancer patients in Bolangir district  and poor people of Bolangir and neighbouring district would be able to get treatment here, rather than going to other places and incurring a lot of expenses, says  Prasant Senapthy.
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Monday, September 16, 2019

‘Migrant kids are most invisible & exploited’Monday, 16 September 2019 | SUDHIR MISHRA | BALANGIR

‘Migrant kids are most invisible & exploited’

 |  | BALANGIR
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A regional-level consultation on protection of rights of migrant children was held here on Friday by the Odisha State Commission for Protection of Child Rights and Aide et Action, Bhubaneswar.
It was attended by officials of various departments like Labour, Child Development and Education. CDPOs, members of Child Welfare Committee ChildLine, NGOs and civil society organisations from Balangir, Nuapada, Kalhandi and Bargarh districts were present.
According to the Census 2011 reports, there are  453.6 millions migrants in India out of which 46.3 millions are migrating for work and employment. Similarly, 14.6 million people of Odisha are migrants.
As per the UNESCO, children constitute 15 per cent of the total migrants in India.  Child migration, or children in migration  is the movement of children within or outside of the State boundaries, with or without parents or legal guardians.
The children, who largely migrate seasonally with their parents to the inter-State and intra-State destination, are deprived of basic education, child care, immunisation, health nutrition and protection from abuse and child labour. Brick kilns are one such informal sector where infant to adolescent live for 7-8 months as invisible entity and subjected to exclusion, exploitation and abuse.
A study conducted by the International Labour Organisation and Aide et Action in 100 villages of Kalahandi, Balangir and Nuapada districts during 2011-12 revealed that among the brick kiln migrant workers families, children constitute 35 per cent (children below 6 years 13 per cent and 6-14 age group 22 per cent) of the total migrant population.
The migration data from the Labour Department suggest that close to 1,40,000 people are registered under the ISMWA and majority of the workers are from western Odisha. The labour registration data at the districts doesn’t provide any gender and age specific information about the migrants.  Therefore, children always remain invisible and unreached.
Among others, Chairperson, State Commission for Protection of Child Rights (SCPCR) Sandhyabati Pradhan, district  Collector, Balangir, Arindam Dakua, Director-Migration and Education, Aide et Action, South Asia, Ummi Daniel and Member, SCPCR Harihar Naik deliberated on the issue.